How big is the emerald ash borer threat to Denver?

State forest service officials say an emerald ash borer infestation could affect up to one of every six trees in the area and cause as much as $82 million in damages. Denver hopes to avoid it by educating private property owners, where over 90% of ash trees are located. In anticipation of the emerald ash borer beetle migrating to Denver, Denver Parks & Recreation has launched the Be a Smart Ash campaign to educate property owners of the dangers posed by the beetle.

How many ash trees are there in Denver?

There are 1.45 million ash trees in the metro area, 330,000 of them in the City of Denver. That represents one of every six trees in the area.

Where are ash trees planted in Denver?

Ash trees are one of the most widely planted trees in Denver and are found in nearly every part of the city.

How do I know if I have an ash tree?

Denver Parks and Recreation has a guide to identifying ash trees on its website. If you’re still uncertain, call Donovan Arborists and we’ll be happy to help.

What does an emerald ash borer look like?

Adult emerald ash borers are typically bright metallic green. They’re very small (about 1/3 inch long and 1/16 inch wide). The wing case is usually darker green and can have copper hues. It has a bright red upper abdomen. It also has a small spine found at the tip of the abdomen. Emerald ash beetles can easily be misidentified so it’s important to consult an expert to be sure.

How likely will my ash tree become infested with the emerald ash borer? 

Very likely if the beetle reaches your neighborhood. That’s why it’s important to take preventive measures right away.

Has the emerald ash borer been seen in Denver?

Not as of the moment, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be. With infestations of the ash borer—which has no natural predators—as close as Boulder and Longmont, the Denver forestry department says the time to start preventive treatment is now.

Can I prevent emerald ash borers from infesting my trees?

Yes, if you act in time.  If you have an ash tree, it’s time to start planning your defense. Please read preventive measures.

Can infested trees be saved?

Probably not since any infestation is likely to be massive.

I think my tree is infested. Should I have it removed?

Before deciding to remove a tree, have a licensed arborist determine the best course of action. Symptoms can be misleading. Call Donovan Arborists and we’ll be happy to help.

What does it cost to have an ash tree removed?

Cost can range from $150 to $1,000 or more depending on the size of the tree and the complexity of the job. Other factors include the condition and location of the tree and if stump removal or grinding is included. Donovan Arborists is happy to give a free estimate on tree removal services.

Are other trees in danger from the emerald ash borer?

The emerald ash borer is attracted by chemicals found only in ash trees. But other trees that are weak and nearby could conceivably be affected. The best way to prevent secondary infestation is to keep your landscape healthy with a good maintenance program.

Is it safe to keep my ash trees?

Yes, as long as you take appropriate preventive measures. Please read preventive measures. You should work with a licensed and insured arborist or tree service company on a treatment plan, which is 90 percent effective. Treatment must be repeated every 2-3 years.

Is it safe to plant new ash trees?

Due to the risk of emerald ash borer infestation, planting of ash trees in Colorado is not recommended.

Can I safely plant a different tree in place of an ash?

Yes. Emerald ash borers infest only the tree itself, so as long as the dead tree is removed and disposed of properly, a new species suited to the same conditions should do fine.

What are alternates to ash trees?

The planting of diverse tree species is highly encouraged, as this is the urban canopy’s best defense against tree health problems. Denver’s Office of the City Forester has created a list of approved trees.

What are alternates to ash trees?

The planting of diverse tree species is highly encouraged, as this is the urban canopy’s best defense against tree health problems. Denver’s Office of the City Forester has created a list of approved trees.

We’re committed to protecting your landscape from this emerging threat in a holistic and environmentally friendly manner.

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